Zero Suicide Advisory Group (ZSAG), with Data Panel

What is Zero Suicide?

Goal

To help implement Goals 8 (promote suicide prevention as a core component of health care services) and 9 (promote and implement effective clinical and professional practices for assessing and treating those at risk for suicidal behaviors) of the National Strategy for Suicide Prevention, building on the momentum of the Clinical Care and Intervention Task Force Report.

Background

The Zero Suicide effort has introduced the idea that is now embedded in the National Strategy for Suicide Prevention (NSSP) as Goal 8: Promote suicide prevention as a core component of health care services. Through the work of innovative community partners, we have also taken key steps to address Goal 9 of the NSSP: Promote and implement effective clinical and professional practices for assessing and treating those at risk for suicidal behaviors.

These are significant first steps. However, without further momentum for change, few lives will be saved. Change can be achieved through both bottom-up action (more health care providers and systems adopt the Zero Suicide mission and tools) and through top-down action (e.g. national standards and measures establish suicide prevention as a responsibility of health care systems and providers—not just as someone else’s responsibility). We look forward to dialogue about how this can be accomplished.

The Zero Suicide approach is a comprehensive approach for health care settings incorporating the best and most promising practices to prevent suicide.  Health care settings engaged in a Zero Suicide approach can expect to save lives while reducing costs. This initiative builds on the momentum of a paper released by the Action Alliance’s Clinical Care and Intervention Task Force in 2011, Suicide Care in Systems Framework. The core components of Zero Suicide include: 1) Leadership committed to cultural transformation; 2) Continuity of care and shared service responsibility; 3) Immediate access to care for all persons in suicidal crisis; 4) Productive interactions between persons at risk and persons providing care; 5) Performance evaluation and use of quality improvement; 6) Policies and procedures; 7) Trained and skilled workforce; 8) Universal screening and suicide risk assessment.

Composition and Functions

The Zero Suicide Advisory Group (ZSAG) is a diverse committee comprised of several former members of the Clinical Care and Intervention Task Force as well as others representing various sectors of health care. The ZSAG, which first met in December 2013, will provide expert guidance to refine the clinical care model for use in various health and behavioral health systems with enough specificity to support the development of tools and implementation strategies that behavioral health care settings can employ to reduce suicide and suicide attempts by patients in their care. 

The Zero Suicide Data Panel, a subcomponent of the ZSAG, will create a set of performance measurement tools by which health care organizations can assess lives lost by suicide for people under care. For programs engaged in a Zero Suicide effort, the tools will allow assessment of the impact of their initiative, benchmark the work of pilot sites, review performance, and assess progress with the goal of determining impact and developing an effective, replicable model.

Co-Leads

  • David Covington, LPC, MBA – Co-Lead, Private Sector; CEO & President, RI International, Inc.
  • Mike Hogan, PhD – Co-Lead, Private Sector; Independent Advisor and Consultant, Hogan Health Solutions

Advisory Group Members

  • Karen Chaney, MD, Chief Medical Officer, Terros
  • Henry Chung, MD, Vice President and Chief Medical Officer, Montefiore Care Management Organization
  • Ed Coffey, MD, President and CEO, The Menninger Clinic
  • Kate Comtois, PhD, MPH, Associate Professor, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Harborview Medical Center
  • John Draper, PhD, Project Director, President, National Suicide Prevention Lifeline, Link2Health Solutions, Inc.
  • Suzanne Fields, MSW, LICSW, Senior Advisor to the Administrator on Health Care Financing, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration
  • Frank Ghinassi, PhD, ABPP, Vice President, Quality and Performance Improvement, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic and the UPMC Behavioral Health Network, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center
  • Leah Harris, MA, Communications and Development Coordinator, National Empowerment Center
  • Chuck Ingoglia, MSW, Senior Vice President, Public Policy & Practice Improvement, National Council for Behavioral Health
  • David Jobes, PhD, ABPP, Professor of Psychology, Associate Director of Clinical Training, The Catholic University of America
  • Karen E. Johnson, Senior Vice President, Clinical Services, BH Division Compliance Officer, UHS of Delaware, Inc.
  • Thomas Joiner, PhD, Robert O. Lawton Distinguished Professor of Psychology, Florida State University
  • Bradley E. Karlin, PhD, Chief, Mental Health and Aging & Distinguished Scholar, Education Development Center
  • Virna Little, PsyD, LCSW-r, Senior Vice President, Psychosocial Services, The Institute for Family Health
  • Chuck Lunati, ORSA, CDFM, PMP, LSSBB, Domain Director & Senior Economist, Health Resource Analytics, CALIBRE
  • Richard McKeon, PhD, MPH, Branch Chief, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration
  • Frederick Meservey, LMSW, Director, Suicide Prevention Center of New York State
  • Paul Schyve, MD, Senior Advisor, Healthcare Improvement, The Joint Commission
  • Becky Stoll, LCSW, Vice President, Crisis & Disaster Management, Centerstone
  • Mason Turner, MD, Director of Outpatient Operations, Regional Mental Health and Chemical Dependency, Kaiser Permanente Northern California
  • Ursula Whiteside, PhD, Research Scientist, Forefront

Data Panel Members

  • Peter C. Brown, MA, Executive Director, Institute for Behavioral Healthcare Improvement
  • Karen Chaney, MD, Chief Medical Officer, Terros
  • Robin Davis, PhD, Senior Manager, ICF International
  • Frank Ghinassi, PhD, ABPP, Vice President, Quality and Performance Improvement, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic and the UPMC Behavioral Health Network, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center
  • Chuck Ingoglia, MSW, Senior Vice President, Public Policy & Practice Improvement, National Council for Behavioral Health
  • Karen E. Johnson, Senior Vice President, Clinical Services, BH Division Compliance Officer, UHS of Delaware, Inc.
  • Virna Little, PsyD, LCSW-r, Senior Vice President, Psychosocial Services, The Institute for Family Health
  • Chuck Lunati, ORSA, CDFM, PMP, LSSBB, Domain Director & Senior Economist, Health Resource Analytics, CALIBRE
  • Richard McKeon, PhD, MPH, Branch Chief, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration
  • Brad Nunn, PhD, Vice President for Quality Improvement, Centerstone
  • Jane Pearson, PhD, Chair, Suicide Research Consortium, Division of Services and Intervention Research, National Institutes of Mental Health
  • Paul Schyve, MD, Senior Advisor, Healthcare Improvement, The Joint Commission
  • Becky Stoll, LCSW, Vice President, Crisis & Disaster Management, Centerstone
  • Christine Walrath, PhD, Vice President Social and Economic Research and Evaluation, ICF International
  • Ursula Whiteside, PhD

Staffing Support

  • Sarah A. Bernes, MPH, MSW, Research Associate, Center for the Study and Prevention of Injury, Violence, and Suicide, Education Development Center, Inc.
  • Laurie Davidson, MA, Project Manager, Provider Initiatives, Suicide Prevention Resource Center, Education Development Center, Inc.
  • Julie Goldstein Grumet, PhD, Director of Prevention and Practice, Suicide Prevention Resource Center, Education Development Center, Inc.