Crisis and Emergency Workers

Suicide attempt survivors need widespread availability of mobile crisis teams or crisis intervention teams that are specially trained to work with suicidal people, that are not identifiable “in uniforms” as everyday police, that do not treat a suicidal crisis as a crime and that do not create a police record of a suicidal crisis.

Suicide attempt survivors need emergency response workers and emergency department staff to see a suicidal crisis as a legitimate health issue, and not a reason to mock, mistreat, neglect, or otherwise see the patient as anything other than a person in urgent need of care.

Suicide attempt survivors need emergency response workers and emergency department staff, like clinicians, to be formally trained in working with suicidal people.

Suicide attempt survivors need emergency department staff to ensure rapid follow-up care for after discharge, and need ED staff to consider more options than simply a stay in a psychiatric hospital.

Suicide attempt survivors (SAS) need crisis lines to expand beyond telephone calls to text and social media support, and SAS need crisis line staff in every case to be transparent up front about their policies for handling a case where intervention is judged to be necessary.

Suicide attempt survivors need crisis centers to expand on the existing trend of hiring, taking on as volunteers and otherwise welcoming people who have been suicidal.

Return to main Suicide Attempt Survivors Task Force page